Agropastoralism and Crops Dispersion: A Brief Discussion on Archaeological Sites and Main Discoveries in Archaeobotany in Central Asia

  • Muhammad Azam Sameer Department of History of Science and Scientific Archaeology, School of Humanities and Social Science, University of Science and Technology of China
  • Yuzhang Yang Department of History of Science and Scientific Archaeology, School of Humanities and Social Science, University of Science and Technology of China
  • Juzhong Zhang Department of History of Science and Scientific Archaeology, School of Humanities and Social Science, University of Science and Technology of China
  • Wuhong Luo Department of History of Science and Scientific Archaeology, School of Humanities and Social Science, University of Science and Technology of China
Keywords: archaeobotany, archaeological sites, plant fossils, agropastoralism

Abstract

The sub-branch of archaeology, called archaeobotany connects present-day man with ancient plants. The ancient plant remains to give a picture of agro-pastoralists activities in Central Asia. Through the plant remains, the way of living, food habits, vegetation, economy and agricultural developments of Central Asia have been traced out. Archaeological sites give new insights into the agricultural denomination in the region, which revealed marked differences. Through archaeobotanical investigation of the plant remains like bread wheat(Triticum aestivum), rice( Oryza sativa), foxtail millet( Setaria italica), broomcorn millet( Panicum miliaceum), six-row barley( Hordeum vulgare ), and other plant fossils provide new prospects about ancient food production in the expanse of Central Asia. A brief discussion on Central Asian archaeological sites and recovered plant remains as well as the agricultural exchange of Central Asia with the neighboring regions are the worthy discussion and essence of this paper.

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Published
2018-11-21
How to Cite
Sameer, M., Yang, Y., Zhang, J., & Luo, W. (2018). Agropastoralism and Crops Dispersion: A Brief Discussion on Archaeological Sites and Main Discoveries in Archaeobotany in Central Asia. Malaysian Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities (MJSSH), 3(5), 17 - 29. Retrieved from https://msocialsciences.com/index.php/mjssh/article/view/146
Section
Articles