Increased Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Among Malaysian University Students During the Covid-19

  • Shi-Hui Cheng 1School of Biosciences, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Nottingham Malaysia, Jalan Broga, 43500 Semenyih, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia.
  • May Yee Lau School of Biosciences, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Nottingham Malaysia, Jalan Broga, 43500 Semenyih, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia.
Keywords: Knowledge, Attitude, Practice, Sugar-sweetened beverages, University students, Covid-19

Abstract

Excessive consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) increases calories intake, unhealthy weight gain and eventually contributes to obesity. This study aims to determine the SSB intake pattern and the level of knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) associated with SSB intake among private university students during the Covid-19. A total of 100 university students were enrolled in this study. Self-administered questionnaires were used to determine the SSB intake pattern and KAP. Data were analysed by using SPSS. The most frequently consumed SSB were milk and tea or coffee whereas energy drink being the least consumed. The mean daily sugar intake from SSB among the students was 59.14 ± 51.28 g/day, which is equal to 12 teaspoons of sugar. Multiple linear regression presented that practice is the only factor that significantly associated with SSB intake (adjusted R2= 0.137, F= 3.614, p= 0.003) after adjusting all the variables. In conclusion, the sugar intake from SSB of students was higher than the recommendation level during the Covid-19. Students with good practice scores tends to consume a lower amount of SSB. Effective interventions should focus on reducing SSB intake and practicing a healthy dietary pattern during the Covid-19.

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Published
2022-07-28
How to Cite
Cheng, S.-H. and Lau, M. Y. (2022) “Increased Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Among Malaysian University Students During the Covid-19”, Malaysian Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities (MJSSH), 7(7), p. e001599. doi: 10.47405/mjssh.v7i7.1599.
Section
Articles