The Impact of Hegemony and Apartheid against African American Women: A Critical Study of Alice Walker

  • Imad Mohammad Abbar Department of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Languages and Communication, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI)
  • Wan Mazlini Othman Department of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Languages and Communication, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI)
  • Jihad Jaafar Waham Department of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Languages and Communication, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI)
Keywords: hegemony, apartheid, African American women

Abstract

Through this part the researcher introduces a sufficient analysis of Walker’s selected novels to reflect the ill-treatment against black women in American society from 1970 to 1982. The researcher will analyze Walker’s characters to offer a real justification of the racial oppression, cruelty, unkindness and misery that most of African American women have been faced on the hand of the whites American especially in the south. The researcher support and analyze this subject by trace the life of the main characters that suffer from ill-treatment and racial oppression. The researcher analyzes these texts with regard to black feminist critical theory, to discuss the main themes by tracing group of  heroines who live, represent and portray these topics through a contemporary black American author Alice Walker in her selected novels, The Third Life of Grange Copeland, Meridian , The Color Purple . Referring to the main themes in the statement of the problem and first research questions the researcher achieve that all the characters of the novels are racially oppressed.

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Published
2019-08-05
How to Cite
Abbar, I. M., Othman, W. M., & Waham, J. (2019). The Impact of Hegemony and Apartheid against African American Women: A Critical Study of Alice Walker. Malaysian Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities (MJSSH), 4(4), 76 - 80. Retrieved from https://msocialsciences.com/index.php/mjssh/article/view/238
Section
Articles