Constructing the Palestinian Nation Via Narration and Attachment in Mornings in Jenin: A Postcolonial Perspective

  • Majeed Abjel Ferhood Department of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Languages and Communication, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI), Malaysia
  • Lajiman Janoory Department of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Languages and Communication, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI), Malaysia
Keywords: postcolonial discourse, nationhood, narration, imagination, belonging

Abstract

This article aims at carving the Palestinian nation in the global map via narration. As an artistic genre, Susan Abulhawa's Mornings in Jenin (2010) is a reaction against the methodical Jewish plan that powerfully strives to erase the Palestinians and their state from the universal map in the aftermath the turning event of the 1948 catastrophe. The article traces actions and behaviours of the immigrated Palestinian characters whose minds, souls and bodies have a strong attachment to their native homeland. Based on the notable post-colonial theorist Homi Bhabha’s theory of nation, I do a careful reading of the Susan Abulhawa's novel within the theoretical framework of postcolonial criticism. Homi Bhabha encourages the people of the colonized nations including the Palestinians to restore their stolen homelands by narration and a permanent reminiscence. The study concludes that the Palestinians will not forget their case forever. The continuation of narrating the Palestinian story will doubtless abort the colonialism.

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References

Abulhawa, S. (2010). Mornings in Jenin: A Novel, USA, New York: Bloomsbury

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Published
2020-11-01
How to Cite
Ferhood, M. and Janoory, L. (2020) “Constructing the Palestinian Nation Via Narration and Attachment in Mornings in Jenin: A Postcolonial Perspective”, Malaysian Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities (MJSSH), 5(11), pp. 240 - 244. doi: https://doi.org/10.47405/mjssh.v5i11.531.
Section
Articles