A Review of Explicit Vocabulary Instructions for ESL Learners during COVID-19 Pandemic

  • Mohd Haniff Mohd Tahir Department of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Languages and Communication, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI)
  • Intan Safinas Mohd Ariff Albakri Department of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Languages and Communication, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI)
  • Puteri Zarina Megat Khalid Department of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Languages and Communication, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI)
  • Mazlin Mohamed Mokhtar Department of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Languages and Communication, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI)
  • Muhamad Fadzllah Zaini Department of Malay Language and Literature, Faculty of Languages and Communication, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI)
  • Md Zahril Nizam Md Yusoff Department of Malay Language and Literature, Faculty of Languages and Communication, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI)
Keywords: explicit vocabulary instructions, secondary ESL learners, COVID-19 pandemic

Abstract

During COVID-19 pandemic, alternative learning arrangements have been applied and used, so that it is possible to perform distance learning. Teachers have typically changed their teaching practises from conventional classroom meetings to distance learning by using electronic equipment, either online or offline. Internet networks have been the cornerstone during this time, with the use of social media apps such as Whatsapp and Telegram, social networking sites such as Facebook Live and Instagram Live, and platforms for video conferencing such as Google Meet and Zoom. In order to deal with the COVID-19 period for the better, English language teaching has also improved. The learning of English vocabulary also tailored to accommodate for distance learning as the use of vocabulary for good communication in one's life is crucial, regardless of whether or not one is in the midst of COVID-19 pandemic. This paper systematically reviews previous research undertaken on explicit instructions for vocabulary and suggests a structure for discussing English vocabulary teaching strategies. In learning, teaching, and undertaking vocabulary studies, this analysis may have some theoretical consequences for learners, educators, and researchers.

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Published
2021-08-10
How to Cite
Mohd Tahir, M. H., Mohd Ariff Albakri, I. S., Megat Khalid, P. Z., Mohamed Mokhtar, M., Zaini, M. F. and Md Yusoff, M. Z. N. (2021) “A Review of Explicit Vocabulary Instructions for ESL Learners during COVID-19 Pandemic”, Malaysian Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities (MJSSH), 6(8), pp. 384 - 393. doi: https://doi.org/10.47405/mjssh.v6i8.961.
Section
Articles