Globalization as a Factor for Language Endangerment: Nigerian Indigenous Languages in Focus

  • Sale Maikanti Department of Hausa, Department of Igbo, Adeyemi College of Education, Ondo, Nigeria
  • Austin Chukwu Department of Hausa, Department of Igbo, Adeyemi College of Education, Ondo, Nigeria
  • Moses Gideon Odibah Department of General Studies Education, Kogi State College of Education (Technical), Kabba, Nigeria
  • Moses Valentina Ogu Department of General Studies Education, Kogi State College of Education (Technical), Kabba, Nigeria
Keywords: globalization, empowerment, languages, endangerment, multilingual

Abstract

Globalization can be viewed from economic, cultural and socio-political perspectives including information and communication technology (ICT). In view of this, it is seen as the increasing empowerment of western cultural values including language, philosophy and world view. In many African countries Nigeria inclusive, English language which is the language of colonization is gradually becoming a global language due to its influence and subsequent adoption as the official language by many African nations which are largely multi-cultural and multilingual under the British colony. This trend has not only relegated the status of Nigerian Indigenous languages to the background but has also threatened their existence in Nigeria which accommodates over 500 native languages. If this trend is left unchecked, the ill-wind of globalization will gradually sweep the native languages including the so-called major ones (Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba) out of existence particularly in Nigeria. This paper discusses globalization as one of the major factors for language endangerment with respect to Nigeria as a nation, with a view to proffering possible solutions capable of sustaining and empowering the nation’s socio-cultural and economic stability.

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Published
2021-09-10
How to Cite
Maikanti, S., Chukwu, A., Odibah, M. G. and Ogu, M. V. (2021) “Globalization as a Factor for Language Endangerment: Nigerian Indigenous Languages in Focus”, Malaysian Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities (MJSSH), 6(9), pp. 521 - 527. doi: https://doi.org/10.47405/mjssh.v6i9.1055.
Section
Articles